CRM 2011 – Rite of Passage – building the plugin registration tool

One of the things I never have quite understood everyone has to build the plugin regristration tool.  It’s like some kind of CRM developers rite of passage and a confusing way to get started in the CRM development world.

I guess the reason must be something to do with legal liability or some trifling matter.

I have moved computer so I had to go through the process again, it also gave me the opportunity to download the new 5.05 CRM 2011 SDK with it’s new fancy add ins within in Visual studio (I haven’t tried that yet).

so I tried to build the plugin registration tool and I got the error

Error 1 The type ‘Microsoft.IdentityModel.Protocols.WSTrust.RequestSecurityTokenResponse’ is defined in an assembly that is not referenced. You must add a reference to assembly ‘Microsoft.IdentityModel, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35’. 

big long errors like this are always a bit tricky to type into google, it’s too many words but I had come up agaisnt this problem before, so I ended up searching my own blog and typing in the word foundation brought up the winning ticket.

Basically I needed to download the Windows Identity Foundation download which you can find here

 

I downloaded and ran that and the problem was fixed.

There was also a plugin profiler lurking in the directory but I have no idea what that is and can’t find any information about it.

I have to say the CRM 2011 SDK has loads more sections and examples added to it, compared to the first couple of editions.  Keep up the good work Microsoft.

CRM 2011 Administrator’s Guide

I saw this link on the TAO of CRM’s blog which is a great source for CRM information and articles.  http://thetaoofcrm.com/2011/08/15/crm-2011-administrators-guide/

he pointed me towards the fact there is a CRM 2011 Administrator’s guide which you can download here

it’s an administrators guide to CRM 2011 and it goes through lots of admin tasks you might need to go through , like adding/changing business units, setting up connections etc.  Here is the contents page

Administrators Guide – Setting Up Your Organization 1

Create or change the settings for a business unit 1

Create a new business unit 2

Set auto-number formats 2

Set system-wide settings 3

Set fiscal year settings 4

Work with connections 5

Work with connections and connection roles 6

Set preferences for product updates 6

Create or edit a site 6

Set system-wide privacy preferences 7

Determining E-mail Access for Your Organization 7

Controlling Data Access 8

Business Units 8

Security Roles 8

Overriding Security Roles 8

Securing Custom Fields 8

Work with Security Roles 9

Work with Business Units 11

Create or change the settings for a business unit 11

Assign a different parent business unit 12

Change the business unit for a record 12

Enable or disable a business unit 13

Work with Teams 14

Create or edit a team 14

Add or remove team members 15

Managing Users 16

Add or remove users for a territory 16

Manage a User’s Record 16

Work with Your User Record and Work Hours 17

Work with Announcements 18

View announcements 18

Work with Integrated Instant Messenging 20

Send or Copy a Shortcut 21

Install Microsoft Dynamics CRM E-mail Router 23

Work with E-mail Templates 24

E-mail Permissions 24

Permissions required for e-mail-related tasks 24

View Your User Profile 25

Using Connect to Define How Records Relate 26

Work with connections 26

Work with connections and connection roles 27

Using Connect to Define How Records Relate 27

Managing Relationship Roles 28

Using Relationship Roles 28

Types of Relationships 28

Managing Relationship Roles 29

Work with Relationship Roles 29

Relationship Roles Dialog Box 29

Customer Relationship Form 31

Opportunity Relationship Dialog Box 32

Changing Regional and Language Options for Your Organization 33

CRM 2011 – What are Discount lists and how do they work

I found myself looking at Discounts lists this week.  I have to admit I have never looked at discount lists before so I wasn’t sure what to expect or how they work.

It’s easy to get a bit muddled when dealing with Products, products lists, discount lists and where they all fit in the product catalog settings.

But then I found this brilliant explanation which I found in the Resource Center which is lurking on the bottom left menu of your CRM 2011 online.  CRM 2011 doesn’t have a user manual (which is very surprising) but on the Resource centre it has lots of fantastic explanations with easy to understand flow diagrams

 

The above diagram shows you where discount lists fit into the product catalog process.

Discount lists fit in at the start of the process because they are a system of offering discounts based on number of items ordered.  So you could say I will give a 5 percent discount for orders over 1000 items.  You set a lower and upper limit to the discount, so you could say the discount begins with orders over 1000 and continues with orders up to 9999.  This means you can then add another discount for orders of 10000 and more.

There are some instructions here on how to create discount lists and magnetism also have a good article on discount lists.

The one thing it took me a little while to work out was discount lists are created without being linked to anything and then you can apply them to products on a price list, you cannot apply discount lists to products by themselves.

They are basically a tool to incentivise clients to purchase larger orders and getting a better price if they do.

There are always sections and functionality of CRM 2011 I haven’t used before and luckily there are always people who have written about them.

 

 

 

 

Excellent Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Development Resources

I found this great development resource today.  I’m sure I have seen this before but when I saw the list of items included in this list they are a very impressive and comprehensive list.

I will include a couple of interesting sections but go and bookmark the original here because looking at the list it seems to be updated quite often

 

 

References & Reading Materials

CRM Developer Center Whether you are just starting with CRM development or you are a seasoned guru, this is the place to start – Microsoft Dynamics CRM Developer Center on MSDN.
CRM 2011 SDK – Download The tool of any CRM developer – Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 SDK. Download, install and make sure to read every night. Tons of samples.
CRM 2011 SDK – Online Read the SDK online – same content but available in any Internet cafe. And, most likely, updated more frequently than downloadable version.
CRM 2011 Developer Training Kit This training kit is for .NET developers to learn the development features of Dynamics CRM and help them build applications using Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 and CRM Online.
Entity Relationship Diagrams Microsoft Office Visio diagrams that show the logical database structure for Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011, in its out-of-the-box state.
CRM 2011 SDK Example Index List of SDK example links laid out by web service message

Development Helpers

CRM 4 to CRM 2011 JavaScript Converter Tool Rhett Clinton’s tool for converting JavaScript from CRM v4.0 to CRM 2011 format.
OData Query Designer Rhett Clinton’s tool for building OData queries. It is a Silverlight 4 application that is packaged as a Managed CRM 2011 Solution.
JavaScript SOAP Request FormatterNew! Jamie Miley’s tool to format captured envelopes in Jscript, ready for use in the CRM GUI.
Visual Studio Plugin TemplatesNew! Pogo69’s Visual Studio 2010 templates for plugin and custom workflow activity
NuGet plugin packageNew! Gayan Perera’s Visual Studio NuGet package for Microsoft CRM 2011 plugins
CRM 2011 Metadata Browser Rhett Clinton’s tool for viewing entity metadata. It is a Silverlight 4 application that is packaged as a Managed CRM 2011 Solution.
Entity Metadata Browser This HTML/JScript metadata browser shows all the entity and attribute metadata. You can:
– Filter the data displayed
– Copy Property names and values to your clipboard
– Open editable entities
This solution is included in the Microsoft CRM 2011 SDK.
Ribbon Browser New! Tanguy Touzard’s utility to view information about all Ribbon UI information for assistance in development and scripting.
CRM LINQPad Plugin LINQPad plugin for Microsoft CRM lets you design and run LINQ queries against Microsoft CRM 2011 in a matter of minutes, just like you run your SQL queries from SQL Server Management Studio
JavaScript Web Resource Manager New! Tanguy Touzard’s utility to manage all JavaScript Web Resources at once. Does not manage the associations between forms and Web Resources.
Export JavaScript Utility New! This utility exports the JavaScript web resources found in a specified CRM 2011 solution. It creates a Visual Studio solution to package everything together. Written by Mitch Milam.
CRM 2011 Development Skeleton New! A small Visual Studio 2010 solution that contains all you needed to get started connecting and communicating with CRM 2011. Written by Mitch Milam.
JScript IntelliSense for Form Script Libraries Use this solution to enjoy full IntelliSense and in-line documentation about the Xrm.Page object methods when writing form scripts. This is a combination of a CRM solution and a Visual Studio extension that captures a snapshot of the structure and data in a given form. You can test your scripts in Visual Studio as you write them. This solution is part of the Microsoft CRM 2011 SDK.

 

ISV Helpers

View Layout Replicator The popular Tanguy Touzard’s utility for CRM 4 for easily replicating column layouts across many views in CRM 4 has received a facelift for CRM 2011. Recommended.
Searchable Property Updater The popular Tanguy Touzard’s utility for CRM 4 for easily updating “ValidForAdvancedFind” attributes property in CRM 4 has received a facelift for CRM 2011. Recommended.
Entity Metadata Browser This HTML/JScript metadata browser shows all the entity and attribute metadata. You can:
– Filter the data displayed
– Copy Property names and values to your clipboard
– Open editable entities
This solution is included in the Microsoft CRM 2011 SDK.
SiteMap EditorNew! Tanguy Touzard’s offering for CRM 2011 SiteMap editing matches many of the capabilities of Patrick Verbeeten’s CRM 4 counterpart.

 

 

 

 

 

CRM 2011 – Sales Automation Videos

I was looking for some Sales videos this week to send to a client to give him a bit of an overview how you can use CRM 2011 in your sales process.

I also found a nice video on using outlook and dashboards.

sales demo part 1

sales module part 2

outlook

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OvgJga5QHM&feature=related

living in outlook

dashboards and charts in CRM 2011

CRM 2011 – Mobile Express looks good

I was doing a presentation this week for a customer who had decided to move to Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 but they hadn’t really seen it in action and didn’t really know what it could do.  This is one of the reasons you I have been posting CRM 2011 videos on this blog, I have been getting some tips on showing the core functionality and sexy features of CRM 2011

 

The Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 website is really well structured, easy to understand with screenshots.  A lot of my presentation was screenshots.   CRM 2011 looks a lot better than previous releases, especially with the dashboards and charts.

One of the screenshots I used was about mobile express, it’s something I new existed by didn’t have any idea what it really was.  The way I understood it was it allowed you to create a separate, simplified screen for mobile phones.

Then the customers started asking me questions about it and I had to tell them I have just collected a home work task and I wouldn’t investigate the functionality.  One of the questions was could you update/add information as well as just view it.  Also does CRM 2011 work with Android.

Firstly I found this good video, actually I had subsribed to Zero2TenCRM because they have a great bunch of CRM videos and then right on cue they release a video show below about CRM mobile express

according to various forum postings then CRM 2011 should work on android phones, although it does mean I would have to set up IFD mode, which strikes me with a bit of fear because I haven’t done it yet (why do we fear the unknown?) and the experience I saw when someone was trying to configure this was it took him quite a while.

I did find a Microsoft Presentation (partner source

 

Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Mobile Express New Features

 

Learn about upgrade, install and application features included in Mobile Express for Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. Course covers new features; knowledge of previous versions of Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a prerequisite. (Online, 40 minutes)


 

here is an excellent article from CRM MVP Jim Wang about CRM 2011 and HTML 5/mobile access.

You can access Mobile Express by simply appending /m to your CRM Server Url.

On Premise
<a href="http://%3Cyourserver%3E:/%3COrganisation%3E/m”>http://<Server&gt;:<Port>/<Organisation>/m

CRM Online
https://<Organisation>.crm.dynamics.com/m    (North America)
https://<Organisation>.crm4.dynamics.com/m (EMEA)
https://<Organisation>.crm5.dynamics.com/m (APAC)

I have found some good web pages describing the benefits of Mobile express

http://www.preact.co.uk/mobile_express.html

http://bingsoft.wordpress.com/2011/03/27/top-11-reasons-to-go-mobile-with-crm-2011-crm2011/

So you might be thinking what will Mobile Express do for me, well here are 11 reasons to go mobile with CRM 2011.

1. Access your data from anywhere

On the way to a client site , in a meeting, at the airport or at home, your data is waiting to be accessed.

2. Access your data from any web capable device

Web capable devices are becoming more common every day. The most common device is the mobile phone though there is an increasing number of other such mobile devices that are just waiting to be connected to Microsoft CRM.

3. Easily configurable within the CRM UI

Enable the entities you want, select the available fields, then publish. It’s really as easy as that. You can even take advantage of Role based forms.

4. Everybody has a mobile device

Do you know anyone who does not have a mobile device.

5. Real-time access to CRM data

Need up-to-date stock levels, case information, an account’s status or even address data, its live data and you want it now.

6. No installation on mobile device required

No need to install special software, no maintenance per device, just a simple Url, bookmark the Url in your mobile device browser and you’re always ready to go.

7. View, Update and Create CRM data on the move

You may need to check pricing, create an appointment, update an account, close a case, and the list goes on. Why wait until you get back to the office, are you even going to go back to the office?

8. Get the competitive advantage

Are your competitors using a CRM Mobile application? They aren’t waiting around to see if you are, so get it first.

9. Talk to your customer and access CRM data at the same time.

While on your phone or in a meeting, you could be giving your customer info they want right there and then, forget about “I’ll have to get back to you later” statements.

10. Increased Productivity

Having CRM data at your finger tips allows you to create that new appointment or update that case without even  opening your laptop or turning on your PC, now you can go get that coffee and donut.

11. It’s FREE

What is there more to say, CRM Mobile Express is free with Microsoft CRM and its waiting for you to connect, check it out and get that competitive advantage now.

and this blog shows you have to quickly get started

http://crmmongrel.blogspot.com/2010/10/mobile-express-for-dynamics-crm-2011.html
http://crmmongrel.blogspot.com/2010/10/mobile-express-for-dynamics-crm-2011_12.html
http://crmmongrel.blogspot.com/2010/10/mobile-express-for-dynamics-crm-2011_2662.html

 

So my next aim is to try and get work to buy me a sexy new phone so I can demo/test the mobile express functionality.   Perhaps Microsoft could send me a phone for writing an excellent blog post on the subject.  Its about time CRM 2011 gave something back to me.

CRM 2011 – Interesting installing information

I was doing an install last week and this week (that’s two install Hosk) and I have read the CRM 2011 dynamics implementation guide many times and well done Microsoft for writing such a great document and one that is easy to read and understand (which is useful when the pressure of the install is on).  You can download the implementation guide here

Whislt reading the document I noticed some interesting bits which I have pasted below, they are things to consider and check when you are installing

 

Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions general requirements

The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions component has the following general requirements:

  • You must complete Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup before you run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup.
  • You can install and run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions on only one instance of SQL Server Reporting Services on a computer.
  • Separate deployments of Microsoft Dynamics CRM cannot share one SQL Server Reporting Services server. However, a single deployment of Microsoft Dynamics CRM that has multiple organizations can use the same SQL Server Reporting Services server.
  • You must run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup on a computer that has Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services installed. For smaller data sets and fewer users, you can use a single-server deployment or a multiple-server deployment. With larger datasets or more users, performance will decrease quickly when complex reports are run. Use a multi-server deployment with one computer that is running SQL Server for Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and another server for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services.

 

SQL Server requirements and recommendations for Microsoft Dynamics CRM

These requirements apply to new and existing installations of SQL Server:

  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM requires an instance of Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services be installed, running, and available. All installations of the supported SQL Server editions can be used as the reporting server. However, the Reporting Services edition must match the SQL Server edition.
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is not supported on Microsoft SQL Server 2000, Microsoft SQL Server 2005, or 32-bit versions of Microsoft SQL Server 2008.
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 is not supported on SQL Server that is running on Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 Server.
  • When Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and SQL Server are installed on different computers, they must be in the same Active Directory directory service domain.
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup and Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Deployment Manager support the default instance or a named instance of SQL Server.
  • Although you can install SQL Server by using either Windows authentication or mixed-mode authentication, Windows authentication is a prerequisite for Microsoft Dynamics CRM.
  • The service account that SQL Server uses to log on to the network must be either a domain user account (recommended) or the Network Service account (you cannot use a local user account on the server). Using a low-privilege account strategy is recommended to help avoid compromising the security of the server.
  • The SQL Server service must be started. This service can be configured to automatically start when the computer is started.
  • SQL Server Agent must be started. This service can be configured to automatically start when the computer is started.
  • SQL Server Full-Text Search must be installed and started. This service can be configured to automatically start when the computer is started.
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup requires a network library to authenticate SQL Server. By default, TCP/IP network libraries are enabled when you install SQL Server 2008. SQL Server can use both TCP/IP or Named Pipes for authentication. However, the computer that is running SQL Server must be configured for at least one of the two network libraries.
  • We recommend that the computer that is running SQL Server be located on the same local area network (LAN) as the computer that is running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
  • The computer that is running SQL Server must be configured to have sufficient disk space, memory, and processing power to support the Microsoft Dynamics CRM environment. For more information see the Microsoft SQL Server hardware requirements topic.
  • Although it is optional, consider accepting the SQL Server default settings for Collation Designator, Sort Order, and SQL Collation. Microsoft Dynamics CRM supports the following collation orders:
    • Case-sensitive
    • Case-insensitive
    • Accent-sensitive
    • Accent-insensitive
    • Binary sort order (such as Latin1_General_100_BIN)

Note

Microsoft Dynamics CRM sets the collation order at the database level. This setting might differ from that set at the SQL Server level.

 

 

SQL Server deployment considerations

Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a database-intensive application. Before you deploy Microsoft Dynamics CRM to an instance of SQL Server, you should consider the following requirements and database configurations.

  • Modification of system tables. The SQL Server system tables should not be modified before you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011. Some database applications may modify the SQL Server system tables. If this occurs, problems with Microsoft Dynamics CRM and data may result.
  • Indexing. Full-text indexing must be installed. This is required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM knowledge-base functionality.
  • Compatibility level. During an upgrade or a new installation, Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup sets the database compatibility level to 100, which is the compatibility level of SQL Server 2008.
  • Autogrowth. By default, Microsoft Dynamics CRM organization database files are created to have an autogrowth setting of 256 megabytes. Earlier versions of Microsoft Dynamics CRM used the default setting of 1 megabyte autogrowth. If you perform intensive database transactions, such as large data imports, consider increasing the autogrowth value to improve performance. For information about how to change the autogrowth setting for a database, see the SQL Server Management Studio Help.
  • Max server memory. We recommend that, if you run SQL Server on a computer that is also running other applications, that the SQL Server max server memory be set to no more than one half of the installed RAM. By default, max server memory is set to 2147483647 bytes in SQL Server 2008, which has demonstrated resource issues with SQL Server during intensive use of Microsoft Dynamics CRM. For more information about the memory options in SQL Server see Server Memory Options.
  • Max degree of parallelism. We recommend that, if you are run SQL Server on a computer that is also running other applications, that the SQL Server max degree of parallelism be set to 1 to help improve performance. For more information about the max degree of parallelism see max degree of parallelism Option.

 

 

Planning requirements for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services

The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions are data processing extensions that are installed on the Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions accept the authentication information from the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and passes it to the Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup includes Fetch and SQL data processing extensions.

The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions are required for all major reporting tasks in Microsoft Dynamics CRM such as, working with default (out-of-box) Microsoft Dynamics CRM reports, uploading custom reports, creating Report Wizard reports, or scheduling reports. Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions must also be installed before you import or provision new organizations.

The Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup does the following:

  1. Installs Fetch and SQL data processing extensions on the Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server.
  2. Installs custom assemblies used by default reports and wizard reports on Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server.
  3. Creates default reports (SQL-based) for the default organization both on Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services server.

The following table explains what reporting options will be available to you if you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions.

Installed? What reports will work?
Default reports Custom SQL-based reports Fetch-based Wizard reports Custom Fetch-based reports
No Clean installation:

Will not be available.

o    Cannot be scheduled.

o    Can be uploaded and run if Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and SQL Server are installed on one computer or Trust for Delegation is configured.

Will not be available. Cannot be uploaded and run.
Yes

 

Will be published for the default organization. Can be uploaded and run. Can be created, run, and scheduled. Can be uploaded, run, and scheduled.

Important

Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions should not be installed on an instance of Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services that is running under an account that is a member of the SQL Access Group. This can occur when Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services is running under the same account as a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 component. This configuration can make the system vulnerable to certain attacks. During installation, Setup detects this scenario. You can click Help for information about how to work around the issue.

Note that when you install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions, you have the option of installing the component on a different server that is running Reporting Services. Therefore, by isolating Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions on a separate instance of SQL Server, which does not store the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases, report performance may be improved.

Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions requirements

Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions has the following requirements:

  • You must complete Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup before you run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup.
  • You must run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup on a computer that has SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services installed. For smaller data sets and fewer users, you can use either a single-server deployment, or a multiple-server deployment with one computer that is running SQL Server for Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and another server for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services. With larger datasets or more users, performance will decrease quickly when complex reports are run.

 

Active Directory requirements

The Active Directory directory service requirements are as follows:

  • The computer that runs Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 and the computer that runs SQL Server, where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM databases are located, must be in the same Active Directory directory service domain.
  • The Active Directory domain where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is located must run in Windows 2000 native, Windows Server 2003 interim, Windows Server 2003 native, or any Windows Server 2008 domain modes.
  • The Active Directory forest where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is located can run in Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003 interim, Windows Server 2003, or Windows Server 2008 forest functional levels.
  • The accounts that are used to run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM services must be in the same domain as the computer that is running Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011.
  • The Microsoft Dynamics CRM security groups (PrivUserGroup, SQLAccessGroup, ReportingGroup, and PrivReportingGroup) must be in the same domain as the computer that is running Microsoft Dynamics CRM. These security groups can be located in the same organizational unit (OU) or in different OUs. To use security groups that are located in different OUs, you must install Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 by using an XML configuration file and specify the correct distinguished name for each pre-existing security group within the <Groups> element. For more information see the Sample server XML configuration file for installing with pre-created groups topic in the Installing Guide.
  • For users who access Microsoft Dynamics CRM from another domain and are not using claims-based authentication, a one-way trust must exist in which the domain where the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server 2011 is located trusts the domain where the users are located.
  • For users who access Microsoft Dynamics CRM from another forest and are not using claims-based authentication, a two-way trust must exist between the forests.

CRM 4 – Outlook not tracking/promoting replies/incoming email.

[tweetmeme source=”BenHosk” only_single=false]

Someone at work reported a problem with the emailing tracking functionality in CRM.  They were tracking outbound emails ok but the replies weren’t being tracked in CRM.

Whilst investigating the problem (there is a tickbox to track inbound emails in CRM) I found this forum posting which listed the various email tracking settings in CRM.  Below is a couple of screenshot I sent to people so they knew what to change and where to find it


In out look go to

Add ins/CRM/Options

Then navigate to the email tab and check the tickbox which says

Check in coming Email in outlook

Here are some other settings to check:

  • User record: E-mail access type – Incoming (Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook)
  • User record: E-mail access type – Outgoing (Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook)
  • System settings (E-mail tab): Use tracking token (not checked)
  • System settings (Outlook tab): Perform checks as new e-mail is received (Yes)
  • System settings (Outlook tab): Promote incoming e-mail every (10 minutes)
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook options (E-mail): Check incoming e-mail in Outlook and determine whether an e-mail should be linked and saved as a Microsoft Dynamics CRM record (checked)
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook options (E-mail): Track (E-mail messages from CRM Leads, Contacts and Accounts)
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook options (E-mail): Display icon (Microsoft Dynamics CRM icon)
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook options (Address Book): Contacts (Match all contacts in Microsoft Dynamics CRM)
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Outlook options (Address Book): Other record types (Match all items in Microsoft Dynamics CRM)

Finally, worth checking a couple of other simple things:

  • You can manually track an e-mail and it it gets tracked as expected in the CRM database
  • The test sender’s e-mail address appears once and once only in the CRM database

CRM 2011 – Step by step guides to Installing CRM 2011

I have got to do a CRM installation this week so I have been reading the implemenation guide, which I have to say is an excellently written document and full credit for Microsoft, you can download that here

 

It’s funny at the time I studied and passed the CRM 4 installation certification I wasn’t installing CRM and just wanted to study for it to learn more about CRM and it’s various components but now I am very happy I did that certification because I know have a good grounding about all the different parts of CRM

The document is good but the one weakness it has is it doesn’t have any pictures, pictures can be very reassuring when you see the same picture in the guide as you have on screen.

Luckily there are some other fantastic CRM 2011 installation guides out there

the CRM wiki – http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/how-to-install-microsoft-dynamics-crm-2011.aspx

 

how to install CRM – http://dynamics-crm2011.blogspot.com/2011/04/how-to-install-microsoft-dynamics-crm.html

 

a step by step guide to installing CRM 2011, with loads of screenshots –http://community.dynamics.com/product/crm/crmtechnical/b/pabloperalta/archive/2010/10/31/step-by-step-installing-crm-2011-on-premise-and-migrating-from-dynamics-crm-4-0-32-bits-on-premise.aspx